GILLETTE, Wyo. | By MEAD GRUVER (AP) — A project in the country’s top coal-producing area seeks to pump the carbon dioxide produced by burning that coal back underground. The project is one of dozens nationwide that stand to get a big boost from tax credits in the new climate bill plus a share of $2.5 billion in funding for carbon capture and storage in last year’s infrastructure bill. It’s also part of Wyoming’s vision of becoming a center for carbon capture and storage. The work near the Dry Fork Station power plant outside Gillette so far involves drilling two injection wells nearly two miles underground. Proponents of carbon storage say the technology is straightforward but others are skeptical it can ever be done economically.